SILENT VICTORY CAMPAIGN GAME

Want to post your current PBEM turns online instead? Here's the place!

Re: SILENT VICTORY CAMPAIGN GAME

Postby Jeff » Fri Feb 17, 2017 10:17 am

Jeff> - 4 April 1944
<Jeff> - Once again Revanant slips silently away from the wharf.
<Jeff> - And where is the brass sending us this cruise.
*** 2d6 = [2] [6] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - Breaking open the sealed orders, Marianas.
<Jeff> - Our third trip there, hopefully there are targets left afloat!
* Tambor (Revanant) moves In Port (Refit) -> Transit *
*** 2d6 = [5] [5] *** <Jeff>
* Tambor (Revanant) moves Transit -> Transit *
*** 2d6 = [6] [3] *** <Jeff>
* Tambor (Revanant) moves Transit -> Marianas *
<Jeff> - After and uneventful cruise out we enter enemy waters
*** 2d6 = [3] [5] *** <Jeff>
* Tambor (Revanant) moves Marianas -> Marianas *
*** 2d6 = [2] [4] *** <Jeff>
* Tambor (Revanant) moves Marianas -> Marianas *
<Jeff> - Ahh... two ships and a small escort break the horizon
*** 1d6 = [6] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - Night is falling at least
*** 1d6 = [5] *** <Jeff>
* ? moves Large Freighters -> Combat Mat *
* Large Freighter 98c (Getsuyo Maru) (6400) moves Combat Mat -> Combat Mat *
*** 1d6 = [3] *** <Jeff>
* ? moves Small Freighters -> Combat Mat *
* Small Freighter 16c (Tosei Maru) (2400) moves Combat Mat -> Combat Mat *
*** 1d6 = [3] *** <Jeff>
* Mk 14 Steam Torpedo moves Combat Mat -> Combat Mat *
<Jeff> - Let's see if we can thin the herd a bit, 4 fish head for the Getsuyo, 2 are spared for the Tosei
*** 2d6 = [4] [6] *** <Jeff>
*** 2d6 = [5] [1] *** <Jeff>
*** 2d6 = [6] [4] *** <Jeff>
*** 2d6 = [6] [6] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - The crew is rusty, only one fish strikes home!
*** 1d6 = [6] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - At least it explodes!
*** 1d6 = [2] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - Must have hit the fuel tanks, one hit, one sunk ship!!
* Large Freighter 98c (Getsuyo Maru) (6400) moves Combat Mat -> Combat Mat *
* Mk 14 Steam Torpedo, Mk 14 Steam Torpedo, Mk 14 Steam Torpedo, Mk 14 Steam Torpedo moves Combat Mat -> offboard *
<Jeff> - Last two....
*** 2d6 = [5] [5] *** <Jeff>
*** 2d6 = [2] [6] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - Only 1 hits again
*** 1d6 = [3] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - Explodes again
*** 1d6 = [4] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - Crippled but still afloat
* Small Freighter 16c (Tosei Maru) (2400) moves Combat Mat -> Combat Mat *
* Large Freighter 98c (Getsuyo Maru) (6400) moves Combat Mat -> 4/44 *
<Jeff> - Now can we slip away from the circling escort
*** 2d6 = [3] [4] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - The escort heads in the wrong direction, diving down reloading the tubes and coming back up
* Mk 14 Steam Torpedo, Mk 14 Steam Torpedo moves Combat Mat -> offboard *
*** 1d6 = [6] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - The escort has left the damaged Tosei to it's fate
*** 1d6 = [1] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - The sun is coming up as we surface and use the deck gun to finish off the listing ship
* Ammo 2 moves Deck Gun -> Combat Mat *
*** 2d6 = [3] [6] *** <Jeff>
*** 2d6 = [1] [2] *** <Jeff>
*** 1d6 = [2] *** <Jeff>
*** 1d6 = [2] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - The deck gun rakes the freighter and it slips below the waves.
* Ammo 2 moves Combat Mat -> offboard *
* Small Freighter 16c (Tosei Maru) (2400) moves Combat Mat -> 4/44 *
* Tambor (Revanant) moves Marianas -> Marianas *
*** 2d6 = [6] [3] *** <Jeff>
*** 2d6 = [5] [4] *** <Jeff>
* Tambor (Revanant) moves Marianas -> Marianas *
*** 2d6 = [2] [3] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - SJ re roll
*** 2d6 = [5] [4] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - There seems to be little left afloat.
<Jeff> - Most likely cowering in port after the destruction of the two prior ships
* Tambor (Revanant) moves Marianas -> Marianas *
*** 2d6 = [6] [1] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - Finally another ship, although under escort.
*** 1d6 = [4] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - Night is falling as we close the range
*** 1d6 = [3] *** <Jeff>
* ? moves Small Freighters -> Combat Mat *
* Small Freighter 65a (Tsukikawa Maru) (4500) moves Combat Mat -> Combat Mat *
*** 1d6 = [6] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - The escort looks a bit to frisky for my liking!
* Mk 14 Steam Torpedo moves Forward Torpedo Tubes -> Combat Mat *
* Range moves Combat Mat -> Combat Mat *
<Jeff> - Firing a full spread
*** 2d6 = [5] [4] *** <Jeff>
*** 2d6 = [4] [2] *** <Jeff>
*** 2d6 = [5] [2] *** <Jeff>
*** 2d6 = [6] [1] *** <Jeff>
*** 2d6 = [3] [5] *** <Jeff>
*** 2d6 = [4] [2] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - 4 Fish slam home
*** 1d6 = [4] *** <Jeff>
*** 1d6 = [6] *** <Jeff>
*** 1d6 = [3] *** <Jeff>
*** 1d6 = [3] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - All explode!!!
*** 1d6 = [5] *** <Jeff>
*** 1d6 = [5] *** <Jeff>
*** 1d6 = [4] *** <Jeff>
*** 1d6 = [3] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - The ship goes down fast with the hull being gutted.
* Small Freighter 65a (Tsukikawa Maru) (4500) moves Combat Mat -> 4/44 *
<Jeff> - Diving hard.....
*** 2d6 = [4] [1] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - We slip free once again!!!
* Tambor (Revanant) moves Marianas -> Transit *
*** 2d6 = [1] [6] *** <Jeff>
* Tambor (Revanant) moves Transit -> Transit *
*** 2d6 = [2] [6] *** <Jeff>
<Jeff> - And a very peacefull cruise home.
* Tambor (Revanant) moves Transit -> In Port (Refit) *
<Jeff> - No injuries, no damage
<Jeff> - 10 Battle Stars
<Jeff> - Another Bronze Star
* Bronze Star created in Awards
* Bronze Star moves Awards -> Awards *
<Jeff> - Ready to go back out in June 1944.
<Jeff> - At this rate I should have another 7 cruises ;-0
<Jeff> - Three ships this cruise, total of 13,300 tons
<Jeff> - Total 26 ships, 129,900 tons.
Jeff
 
Posts: 78
Joined: Wed Jun 24, 2009 10:23 am

Re: SILENT VICTORY CAMPAIGN GAME

Postby COLTDAGUY » Mon Mar 06, 2017 1:17 pm

USS Sea Dog's Third Patrol Report:


LCDR "Rusty" Gates, captain of the USS Sea Dog (SS-401) stood at the bridge rail looking aft. The deck was a beehive of activity. Crew members formed lines passing boxes and crates from supply trucks on the pier to the open hatches leading below deck. A small crane lifted a torpedo from an open trailer and suspended it over the deck where a crew of men maneuvered it into the torpedo loading hatch... Gates recognized the torpedo as one of the new Mk-27 homing models. The Mk-27 carried a 100 pound warhead and was able to use a sonar homing mechanism to lock onto the sound made by the propellers of a ship. While not powerful enough to destroy a ship, the Mk-27 was capable of damaging the screws of the ship and putting it out of action... perfect for knocking out that escort that was drooping depth charges on you. Seadog was carrying 4 of these Mk-27s along with 12 Mk-18 electrics and 8 of the old Mk-14 steam torpedoes this patrol. Gates had ordered that 1 Mk-27 be loaded into the aft tube to be ready for firing if needed.

There were also 3 of the new NAC Barrage jammers on board. The NAC was a "noise-maker" capable of deceiving sonar operators of escort vessels actively searching for a submarine. The NACs were launched from either a torpedo tube or one of the 3" signal ejector tubes on Seadog. It spewed a stream of noisy bubbles that masked the sounds of the submarine as it moved away luring the escort to follow.

Captain Gates was thinking that he might need both of these new weapons in his current assigned patrol area. Seadog was going to the China Sea this time and most of the remaining Japanese shipping lanes ran thru shallow waters in the China Sea..

The last of the boxes were removed from the trucks on the pier and the Chief of the boat directed the men to other tasks. Gates watched the supply officer hand a clipboard to his executive officer standing on the gangway. After a quick look at the supply requisitions, his Exec signed off on them indicating Seadog had received the supplies. Seadog was getting ready to sail on the evening tide... it was April 1st and Gates was hoping that there were not going to be any "nasty" surprises for them on this patrol...

The sun was setting over Ford Island as Seadog cast off from the submarine pier and backed into the ship channel. Seadog passed the rusting hulk of the USS Arizona as she turned down the channel toward the open sea. Near the entrance to the harbor Seadog rendezvoused with their escort that would see her safely past the harbor defenses and into the open ocean.

Averaging 12 kn. Seadog made good time as she transited to the East China Sea. There were no contacts in route. Seadog arrived in her area on the 15th of April and began patrolling south along the coast of China toward Taiwan. Seadog's first ship contact came on the 5th of May near Taipei.

Lookouts spotted a solo ship making about 8 knots toward the China coast. The target was identified as the 3400 ton freighter Sana Maru. She was not under escort. The sighting occurred at night as Seadog was running on the surface. Captain Gates ordered Seadog to close into gun range for the kill. "Battle Surface!" was ordered and the gun crew began firing Seadog's 5 inch deck gun into the target. 100 rounds were fired and Sana Maru was reduced to a burning hulk that quickly sank below the waves.

Seadog turned north toward Shanghai. Four days later, as Seadog was patrolling near the mouth of Yangtze River she received an Ultra intercept. Ultras, known as "Magic", were decoded incepts transmitted by the Navy's highly secret Cryptographic unit that had broken the Japanese Naval Codes. The crypto people were reading Japan's Naval radio traffic in real time. The Crypto analysts were able to direct submarines to specific locations when valuable targets where know to be passing.

Seadog was advised that a major warship, the Kongo and its task group of escorts would be leaving Shanghai at 0400 on the 10th of May. Seadog moved into position and waited off the harbor entrance to Shanghai. 24 hours later while patrolling on the surface at night Seadog's lookouts spotted a fast moving group of ships leaving the harbor entrance. Seadog changed course to intercept and was rewarded when the Warships made a sharp zig-zag course change that turned the ships directly toward Seadog. She found herself right in the middle of the advancing Japanese task group.

In the moonlight, the Kongo was quickly spotted. Gates decided to attack on the surface at medium range. Kongo could be seen throwing a huge bow wave and would pass withing 4000 yards of Seadog. Using the Torpedo Data Computer or TDC scope as it was called on the sub's bridge, Captain Gates quickly lined up for the shot. He ordered the 4 Mk-14 and 2 Mk-18 torpedoes fired from the bow tubes and then ordered Seadog to turn hard to starboard... When the stern tubes came to bear he ordered 3 more torpedoes, 2 MK-14s and 1 Mk-18 fired at Kongo.

Gates ordered Seadog to dive... The klaxon sounded and running feet raced for the bridge hatchway. Captain Gates was the last off the bridge and hesitated at the top of the ladder to make sure everyone was accounted for before he closed and dogged the hatch. The deck was tilting downward as Captain Gates found his footing in the control room. Seadog was passing 60 feet when the Torpedo Officer clicked his first stop watch ... NOTHING! It was an ominous sound in the quiet of the control room...

"Must have been a dud" he said as he looked over at Gates. The Captain just gave a shake of his head.

Seadog was passing 75 feet when the Torpedo Officer clicked the next stop watch... again... NOTHING! He raised his eyes to meet the Captain's ... Gates shook his head again.

"CAPTAIN! Sonar reports high speed screws turning toward us!" ...

"Looks like they spotted the torpedoes... " Said Gates. "Conn hard right rudder! ... Exec, how much water under the keel?"

"Not much, Captain... Bottom is at 325 feet." replied the navigation officer.

"Level off at 300 feet, then" said Gates.

The third Mk-14 torpedo had run past its hit time and also failed to explode. Gates was looking pretty grim.

Passing thru 110 feet a muffled explosion was heard thru the hull. "A Hit Captain!" called out the Torpedo Officer holding up the stop watch as a symbol of proof. 15 seconds later another explosion followed and then another and another...

Image

"Sonar repots "breaking- up" noises Captain".

"Put it on the PA" said Gates. Instantly, loud rumblings and tearing noises could be heard along with minor explosions... Kongo was in her death- throes!

"Thrummm, Thrummmm, Thrummmm" could now be heard over the breaking up noises of the Kongo.

"Captain High speed screws approaching fast!" called the Sonar operator.

"Left Full Rudder" ordered Gates "Fire that NAC Jammer." A WHOOOOSH-ing sound was heardfrom the speaker as the NAC left a noisy trail of bubbles as it headed away from the Seadog.

"It's not working Captain!" called the sonar operator. "The escort is turning with us..."

"OK, Torpedo Officer, fire that MK-27!"

The Mk-27's high speed whine from its electric motors could be heard leaving the tube.... A few seconds later a muffled explosion followed and the loud Thrummmming coming from the escort's propellers stopped... A HIT!

Seadog slipped away from the fight and made good her escape.

In her last week of patrol in the China Sea, Seadog spotted a single solo ship. It was identified as the 1000 ton freighter Hosen Maru. Seadog made a night surfaced attack at close range and dispatched Hosen Maru with her 5 inch deck gun. Seadog returned to Pearl without further incident.

It was a happy boat that returned from her third patrol with a 37,200 ton battleship and 2 freighters under to her credit!

The patrol was successful. The 37,200 ton Fast-Battleship Kongo had been sunk, along with the 1000 ton freighter Hosan Maru and the 3400 ton freighter Sana Maru for a total of 41,600 tons sunk on this patrol.

Captain Gates received the Navy Cross for sinking Kongo.
Seadog will be ready for patrol again in July 1945.
Bob Best #552
User avatar
COLTDAGUY
 
Posts: 753
Joined: Sat Aug 01, 2009 2:50 pm

Re: SILENT VICTORY CAMPAIGN GAME

Postby COLTDAGUY » Mon Mar 06, 2017 2:06 pm

FOURTEENTH PATROL SUMMARY REPORT FOR SILENT VICTORY CAMPAIGN GAME

This is the April to June 1945 patrol report for our Silent Victory Campaign game that is playing on the AHIKS Forum. Not much has changed for the Japanese Navy. They are being squeezed tighter and tighter as US Submarines roam at will throughout the Pacific. Japanese shipping is sailing at grave risks and it is becoming harder and harder for US Subs to find worthwhile targets. We again have two boats on patrol, USS Seadog and USS Tambor. Here are the results of their patrols.

Our June 1945 patrol report contains the latest "ships sunk" and "total tonnages" for our skippers.

Image

The latest around the "Silent Service!" as of 31 March 1945...

CDR Jim Williams completed 9 war patrols commanding USS Seabass. CDR Williams' wartime total ships sunk is 37. CDR Williams' final tonnage score was 158,200 tons placing him in first place as we enter March 1945. CDR Williams has a Purple Heart, Bronze Star, Silver Star and the Navy Cross with 3 oak leaf clusters. CDR Williams survived the war.

CDR Dennis Sheppard and his "Lucky Lady" Boat are in second place with 154,900 tons of shipping sunk. CDR Sheppard has credit for 6 war patrols and 19 ships sunk. CDR Sheppard has completed the war and retired "Lucky Lady" so this is his final tally.

CDR Jeff Miller II commanding USS Revenant (Tambor) completed his 10th war patrol in USS Tambor. He sank 3 ships for a total of 13,300 tons sunk on this patrol. This brings CDR Miller's score to 26 ships sunk and 129,900 tons of shipping sunk. He was awarded the Bronze Star for sinking 3 ships on this patrol. CDR Miller has been awarded 4 Bronze Stars and 1 Silver Star and the Navy Cross.

CDR Pete Jennings still holds a distant fourth place in the tonnage race even though he is currently assigned to the staff at ComSubPac HQ. CDR Jennings sunk 16 ships for 70,410 tons in five war patrols in USS Salmon.

CDR Sandy Sanderson and USS Seal failed to return from their third patrol to the Sea of Japan. Post war analysis of Japanese shipping records by the US Navy determined that Jennings sank five ships totaling 17,135 tons on Seal's last patrol. This brought his total of ships sunk while commanding S-39 and USS Seal to 14 ships sunk for 65,525 tons putting him in fifth place in the tonnage war.

LCDR O'brein commanding USS Tuna, on his eighth war patrol was forced to the surface before being sunk. LCDR O'brein and his crew were captured and became prisoners of war. LCDR O'brein brings his total ships sunk to 20 with total tonnage sunk being 63,800 tons for the war. He is in sixth place in the tonnage war

LCDR "Rusty" Gates commanding USS Seadog completed his third war patrol. He sank a Capitol Ship, the IJN Fast Battleship Kongo grossing 37,200 tons along with two freighters grossing an additional 4400 tons for a total of 3 ships and 52,100 tons sunk on this patrol.

LCDR Gates received his 2nd Navy Cross for sinking the Kongo. He is in seventh place in the tonnage war.

LCDR Yosemite Sam commanding USS "Tweety" failed to return to Pearl Harbor from his 3rd patrol. USS "Tweety" is listed as Missing In Action - Presumed Sunk. LCDR Sam sunk four ships for 17,200 tons during his short career. He received a Silver Star for his actions. Sam has sunk 7 ships for 27,200 tons and is in eighth place in the tonnage war.

LCDR Roger Mast, commander of S-43 and his crew are listed as Missing In Action, Presumed Sunk. Mast in S-43 sank two ships for 3600 tons for his wartime total. He is in ninth in the tonnage war.

Image
Bob Best #552
User avatar
COLTDAGUY
 
Posts: 753
Joined: Sat Aug 01, 2009 2:50 pm

Re: SILENT VICTORY CAMPAIGN GAME

Postby COLTDAGUY » Mon May 01, 2017 7:41 am

The Japanese Surrender


In early July, Admiral Halsey, commanding the Third Fleet, left from Leyte Gulf for another series of strikes on the Japanese homeland. Most of these were to be air strikes, but this time he planned to bring some of his battleships close to shore to bombard cities and industries. Admiral Lockwood provided submarines to conduct an anti-picket sweep in front of the carriers and to lifeguard for the airstrikes . Two FM-equipped boats, Runner 11, commanded by Benny Bass, and Redfin, commanded by Charles Kilday Miller, conducted mine location probes along the coast where the bombardment was to be conducted.

Task Force 38, joined by twenty-eight British warships, reached Japanese home waters without incident. On July 10, Halsey's planes struck Tokyo. Four days later they raked Hokkaido, and the battleships bombarded coastal cities, including the steel mills located near the coast. Turning south, Halsey struck Tokyo again, then Kure and IJN ships in the Inland Sea. In the following days, he struck Hokkaido again and returned to Tokyo. In all, the air raids went on for well over a month.

The strikes against ships in the Inland Sea July 24 and July 28 destroyed what was left of the Japanese navy. The carrier-battleships Ise and Hyuga, the battleship Hurana, two new aircraft carriers, Amagi and Katsurage, and the cruisers Tone, Aoba, Oyodo, Twatem, lzume, and Settsu were damaged beyond repair. During these raids, Lockwood's submarines lifeguarded, picking up dozens of pilots.

While the July carrier strikes were in progress, a group of nuclear physicists led by Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer set off the first atomic bomb in the desert of Alamagordo, New Mexico. After this test, two atomic bombs were completed and shipped to a special Air Force B-29 Unit on Tinian.

The first atomic bomb was loaded on a B-29 named Enola Gay, piloted by Colonel Paul W. Tibbets, Jr. He took off from Tinian at 2:45 on the morning of August 6. At 8:15 Hiroshima time, he released the bomb over the city. It exploded at about 2,000 feet, destroying 4.7 square miles of Hiroshima and killing an estimated 72,000 people. Another 68,000 were wounded, and thousands were inflicted with radiation sickness. Tibbets returned to Tinian, landing at 2:58 P.M. On August 9, the second atomic bomb was loaded into a B-29 named Bock's Car, piloted by Major Charles W. Sweeney. Sweeney's drop was more difficult. His primary target was Kokura, but there he ran into cloudy weather and switched to the secondary target, Nagasaki. At 10:58 A.M. (Nagasaki time) he found an opening in the clouds. This bomb killed about 40,000 people and injured 60,000.

On the following day, while Task Force 38 roamed up and down the Japanese coast with impunity, Emperor Hirohito advised his cabinet to accept the unconditional surrender terms demanded by the Allies. Hirohito's advisers agreed to do this—provided the Allies would not dethrone or charge the Emperor with war crimes. The message was relayed through Swiss and Swedish channels. The Allies replied that these terms were acceptable, provided the Emperor submit to the authority of a Supreme Allied Commander and give the Japanese people the right to decide his ultimate status through free elections.
While these messages were going back and forth, Lockwood's submarines continued to fire away at Japanese shipping. On August 11, Joseph Icenhower in Jallao, patrolling the Sea of Japan, sank a big transport, Teihoku Maru, 5,795 tons. On August 13, Robert Raymond Managhan in Spikefish sank I-373 off Okinawa. On that same day, Bafford Lewellen in Torsk, patrolling the Sea of Japan, sank a small freighter, Kaiho Maru, 873 tons. The following day, August 14, Lewellen sank two frigates, Coast Defense Vessels Nos. 13 and 47, each about 800 tons. These were the last torpedoes fired by any naval vessel in World War II and the last Japanese ships sunk.

Emperor Hirohito accepted the terms imposed by the Allies and notified them. At fifty-six minutes to midnight, August 14, Admiral Nimitz sent a message to all naval units:

CEASE OFFENSIVE OPERATIONS AGAINST JAPANESE FORCES. CONTINUE SEARCH AND PATROLS. MAINTAIN DEFENSIVE AND INTERNAL SECURITY MEASURES AT HIGHEST LEVEL AND BEWARE OF TREACHERY OR LAST MOMENT ATTACKS BY ENEMY FORCES OR INDIVIDUALS.

Lockwood relayed this message to his submarines.
Bob Best #552
User avatar
COLTDAGUY
 
Posts: 753
Joined: Sat Aug 01, 2009 2:50 pm

Re: SILENT VICTORY CAMPAIGN GAME

Postby COLTDAGUY » Mon May 01, 2017 7:47 am

USS Sea Dog's Fourth Patrol Report


Here is USS Seadog's (SS-401) fourth and final patrol report.

USS Seadog put to sea on the 28th of June, 1945 from Pearl Harbor. LCDR "Rusty" Gates, Sea Dog's Captain stood at the bridge rail looking aft. The coastline of Oahu Hawaii Territory was slowly "sinking" into the ocean about 12 miles behind them. It was a warm afternoon and Seadog was heading west toward the Japanese Empire for another war patrol.

Seadog's mission was to perform Life Guard duty off the coast of the Japan for Admiral Halsey's Third Fleet that was heading north from Leyte to conduct bombing raids on the Japanese home islands. Naval aviators would be bombing targets in a series of raids that stretched from Tokyo to the island of Hokkaido during the next month.

Seadog made good time as she transited to Empire waters. There were no contacts in route. Seadog arrived on station on July 9th in time for Halsey's first raid on Tokyo July 10th. Seadog diligently surfaced at her designated station in daylight off the coast where she could pick up any flyers that received damage during the raids and were forced to ditch. Seadog had no "customers" during any of the scheduled raids. Between strikes, Seadog patrolled the coast line looking for shipping. The ocean was empty of Japanese shipping. After being released from Life Guard duty, Seadog moved south to her assigned patrol area for the remainder of her patrol time.

Seadog was running on the surface just after daylight. Captain Gates had positioned Seadog so the rising sun was to her back and it would make her hard to spot as they watched the coast line for signs of shipping.

"Radar contact - Surface, Captain" said the talker "Bearing 030 degrees at 8 miles". Gates swung his glasses to starboard. Gates could make out a plume of smoke ... looking closer he could see a second plume and then a third...

"It looked like a destroyer leading several merchantmen" Said Gates. "Plot an intercept course!" The talker relayed the message to the conning tower crew below deck. Seadog turned to intercept.

The convoy was making about 8 knots and zig-zagging. After carefully plotting the zig-zags Gates had positioned Seadog in the convoy's path for the attack.

He was watching the convoy now through the periscope. Seadog had closed to medium range and gates was preparing to fire. They had two large fat freighters and a smaller freighter is line astern with a 935 ton Momi class destroyer coming up between the Marus and Seadog, a perfect setup. Gates fired five forward tubes as the Mk-27 "Cutie" was being held in reserve for the Escort if needed.
"The leader is beginning his turn to port now" said the navigation officer as he continued to plot the Convoy ship's course at the plotting table. Gates was doing the "dance" at the periscope with his Exec as he began calling out target bearings.

Then came "Fire One!... Fire Two!..." as Gates sent a Mk-14 and a Mk-18 at each of the large freighters and a single Mk-18 at the small freighter.

"Down Scope... Take here to 300 feet!" said Gates as he snapped up the handles on the periscope. The scope tube hissed as it descended into the deck.

The Torpedo Officer had the stop watches looped around his neck. The time came and went for all five torpedoes. NOTHING!

"I'll be Damned... ALL DUDS!" Exclaimed Gates ...

Sonar reported the speed of the screws did not change on any of the ships. The Escort must have failed to spot the wakes of the two Mark 14s...

On the 6th of August Seadog was on station took up station off of the Bungo Channel leading into the Sea of Japan

They decided to roll the dice and follow the convoy. After surfacing and getting off a contact report Gates turned up flank speed and ran an "end around" to get ahead of the convoy. Just before dark, Gates repositioned Seadog in front of the convoy. This time, Seadog found three small freighters in line astern being guarded by a 1390 ton Minakaze Class Destroyer. Gates fired 2 Mk-14s at the escort and three Mk-18s at the largest of the freighters, the 2700 ton Shinkyo Maru. Both ships were sunk and Seadog evaded the escorts.

Gates decided to roll the dice again and follow the convoy. In a night surface attack at medium range gates fired the remaining Mk-18s from the forward tubes and then turned to fire the rear tubes at a large freighter and the escort. There was no dice roll penalty as Gates has a Navy Cross. All torpedoes hit and Seadog was credited with a 1390 ton Minakaze Class destroyer and the 6400 ton Passenger liner Ural Maru.

The convoy made good its escape just as Seadog was able to avoid the convoy escorts.

On the morning of August 6th Seadog was tasked with another Lifeguard assignment. She was surfaced and standing at her assigned position several miles south east of the Bungo Channel. Seadog's crew was at battle stations and Gates was on the bridge. At 0815 hours local time a brilliant white flash lit up the daytime sky. It was followed by a muffled Boooom! All eyes turned toward the light. In the far distance over what the navigator later estimated was Hiroshima a large mushroom shaped cloud rose into the upper stratosphere.

Image

Seadog was over 60 miles away and her crew could see the mushroom cloud from the first atomic bomb that detonated over Hiroshima. There was stunned silence among the crew at the raw power of the atomic explosion that was unleashed.

Seadog continued patrolling her area. Thru radio messages Seadog learned that a second atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki on the 9th of August and still the Japanese failed to surrender. In the evening hours of August 14th, Seadog picked up a small freighter with an escort moving north up the coast toward Tokyo.

Running on the surface, Gates was able to identify the freighter as the 1900 ton Kotoku Maru and a 935 ton Momi Class Destroyer. Gates still had 2 Mk-18 and one Mk-14 torpedo aft along with two Mk-27 and two mk-27s forward so he increased speed and maneuvered to cut off the two ships. At 0010 hours on 15 August, the Momi class destroyer passed to the far sid e of the freighter. Gates gave the order to turn Seadog into the target and stand by to fire.

Gates was looking thru the TBT and lining up the Freighter to fire the remaining torpedoes aft.

"Captain!...FLASH Message from ComSubPac" said the talker.

Gates looked up from the TBT at the talker. "What does it say?

From Admiral Admiral Nimitz/CincPac
To: All naval units:

CEASE OFFENSIVE OPERATIONS AGAINST JAPANESE FORCES. CONTINUE SEARCH AND PATROLS. MAINTAIN DEFENSIVE AND INTERNAL SECURITY MEASURES AT HIGHEST LEVEL AND BEWARE OF TREACHERY OR LAST MOMENT ATTACKS BY ENEMY FORCES OR INDIVIDUALS.

Signed Lockwood/ ComSubPac.



Seadog returned from her 4th and final war patrol with a freighter and a passenger ship and two destroyers sunk for total of 11,425 tons of shipping to her credit!

The life Guarding Mission was unsuccessful but Seadog survived the war.
Captain Gates received the Bronze Star for sinking four ships.
Seadog will be returned to CONUS in October 1945.
Bob Best #552
User avatar
COLTDAGUY
 
Posts: 753
Joined: Sat Aug 01, 2009 2:50 pm

Re: SILENT VICTORY CAMPAIGN GAME

Postby COLTDAGUY » Mon May 01, 2017 7:49 am

FROM THE GAMEMASTER......

THE FINAL RESULTS

I apologize for the delay in getting this final patrol report posted for our Silent Victory Campaign. Unfortunately real life has a way of disrupting our best laid plans, but here is the final chapter of our game and the final standings of our submarine skippers.

Jim Williams is our Campaign Game Winner with 158,200 tons of shipping sunk during Sea Bass' nine war patrols. Jim sunk a total of 37 ships. CONGRATULATIONS JIM!

The breakdown of each of our players statistics is posted in the final patrol summary sheet. If you want to read thru the AARs and the detailed submarine war history material supporting the campaign go to http://www.ahiks.com/forum and select on-line games from the menu. The Silent Victory Campaign game is listed there.

I would like to thank all of you for playing and I do hope you had fun. You all wrote some really interesting After Action Reports that really contributed to the overall flavor of the Campaign Game and it was a pleasure to run the game.

I hope all of you who have followed the game enjoy it too! THANK YOU EVERY ONE!

Image
Bob Best #552
User avatar
COLTDAGUY
 
Posts: 753
Joined: Sat Aug 01, 2009 2:50 pm

Previous

Return to Online Games

cron